Hero. A person of strong courage and honor that is recognized through astounding achievements and one who posses’ noble qualities. In the Epic of Gilgamesh, King Gilgamesh is specifically stated in this epic, the King of Uruk. King Gilgamesh is proven to be a true hero through his intelligence, willingness to die, and a strong possession of human characteristics.
King Gilgamesh is attributed as being a “wise” man, mostly for his intelligence. This trait of intelligence asserts Gilgamesh into a hero position mostly because this is one view as to which we see a hero in today’s world. In this Epic, Gilgamesh shows true companionship for his land, “Gilgamesh took up a kid, white without spot, and a brown one with it; he held them against his breast, and he carried them into the presence of the sun. He took in his hand his silver sceptre and he said to glorious Shamash, “I am going to that country, O Shamash, I am going; my hands supplicate, so let it be well with my soul and bring me back to the quay of Uruk. Grant, I beseech, your protection, and let the omen be good” (72). Gilgamesh proved himself to be a worthy leader and decided to never ask permission from Shamash as he, “wanted his voice to be heard” (72). Gilgamesh had to foolish, yet he was too brave to fight for something larger than what Shamash was holding him back from. Gilgamesh had been highly persistent in his defense. The King of Uruk wrestled with this and had concluded to have no desire on giving up. Shamash pleaded to Gilgamesh, “Gilgamesh, you are strong, but what is the Country of the Living to you?” Gilgamesh had been bothered with all the suffering within the city of Uruk.
Gilgamesh had a strong ambition to conquer this wild type frontier within this chosen passage. His boldness to go fight and make a “god” of himself showed a strong value to fight for a goodness, even if it wasn’t possible to happen. Through this battle, Enkidu spoke upon Gilgamesh for his ambition, “O my lord, if you will enter that country, go first to the hero Shamash, tell the Sun God, for the land is his. The country where the cedar is cut belongs to Shamash” (71). Such ambitions and desires were derived form these gods, Gilgamesh being a strong example for the action.
King Gilgamesh had a strong care for his kingdom in Uruk. He cared for the kingdom rather than having a passion for his fame and glory, which clearly shows a reader true heroism within this epic. He had a willing characteristic to give up his own safety and sacrifice himself for a greater cause, clearly shown on page 72 in the novel. Gilgamesh strived for the power of wisdom and intelligence, rather than having a ruling power. He developed a strong aspect of loyalty and gave a devoted attitude to his people of Uruk. Gilgamesh lived to be unselfish and willing to sacrifice his own life for others. Gilgamesh’s journeys taught him that his achievements were the key to his long-lasting legacy.