Caregiver is a person, who faces the challenges of taking care of their beloved ones; express their feelings depend on their social support networks to assist them understand with their life situations (Garcia-Dia, 2013). Care giving is not restricted to a single support type; on the contrary it involves emotional, physical and financial support (Toseland, 2001). Issues such as routine health care (drug intake, medication, follow-up), personal care (bathing, feeding, toilet, and dressing), transportation, shopping, petty housework, money management, are all included in care giving (Toseland, 2001).
Spouses, adult children and family members alike are in danger to caregiver fatigue whether they are giving care twenty-four hours a day or providing care from a distance. The sandwich generation is more likely to face particular challenges because they have to provide care to their parents while juggling the demands of young families and their fulltime careers (Laura Downs, 2013)
Family caregivers are at risk of physical and emotional problems of their own while they are giving care to their loved one. Fatigue contributes to an increased vulnerability to disease and it is frequent in nearly all caregivers yet ignore by most. The results of fatigue creep in over time, stealing the energy and focus of a caregiver. They often become so indulged in their role as they forget their own health and personal lives. By the time many care providers realize they have become caregivers; they are already suffering from the symptoms of caregiver fatigue and are leading towards the burnout Living with kidney disease is not something from which only patient is suffering. Nevertheless, family dynamics often change when one member has a chronic illness. The people closest to the patient are often emotionally affected. (Kristine Dwyer, 2017).